Our conservation efforts include:

1.

Human-Predator conflict

The Livestock Guarding Dog Programme has placed 300+ dogs on South African farms since 2005 to provide a non-lethal means of predator control resulting in about 375,000 hectares of cheetah/predator safe areas. We participate in Farmer and Wildlife forums in order to better understand conservation issues and provide assistance. 2. Cheetah Population Cheetah Outreach is an adviser to Range-wide Cheetah and Wild dog conservation group. It supports the effort to stop illegal trade in cheetah and breeding by managing the Regional Cheetah Studbook. 3. Education Cheetah Outreach hosts a curriculum-linked series of interactive presentations providing South African children from all backgrounds the opportunity to learn about and be inspired by their natural wildlife heritage.  We see up to 5 000 learners annually, providing sponsored transport to disadvantaged communites.   The school programme has evolved to develop curriculum- linked resources addressing literacy and Natural Science in four of our national languages 4. Research Our research projects have included cheetah health, human-wildlife conflict and conservation education.  We have produced publications and technical reports for the international audience.  We plan to do a first of its kind census in cheetah range, focused on areas outside of protected areas.
Today, there are only an estimated 7,100 cheetahs left in the wild. The primary reason for the cheetah’s decline is shrinking range due to habitat loss throughout Africa. Drastic increases in human population and proliferation of domestic animals has led to loss of habitat and prey, and increasing conflict with man There are about 1,326 cheetahs in South Africa, including 412 in Kruger NP, 80 in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, 334 in small fenced parks and private reserves, and about 500 free ranging cheetahs on farmlands in the northern part of the country. At Cheetah Outreach we understand the complexity and issues involving cheetah conservation.  We are proud of our continuing efforts over the past 20 years to protect the South African cheetah.  Our livestock guarding dog field staff work with land owners in cheetah range areas to find ways of mitigating human-wildlife conflict.  Our education staff work with local schools to teach a conservation ethic to young children.  Visitors to our facility are provided with a comprehensive talk on conservation and our efforts
Conservation
Conservation
Today, there are only an estimated 7,100 cheetahs left in the wild. The primary reason for the cheetah’s decline is shrinking range due to habitat loss throughout Africa. Drastic increases in human population and proliferation of domestic animals has led to loss of habitat and prey, and increasing conflict with man There are about 1,326 cheetahs in South Africa, including 412 in Kruger NP, 80 in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, 334 in small fenced parks and private reserves, and about 500 free ranging cheetahs on farmlands in the northern part of the country. At Cheetah Outreach we understand the complexity and issues involving cheetah conservation.  We are proud of our continuing efforts over the past 20 years to protect the South African cheetah.  Our livestock guarding dog field staff work with land owners in cheetah range areas to find ways of mitigating human-wildlife conflict.  Our education staff work with local schools to teach a conservation ethic to young children.  Visitors to our facility are provided with a comprehensive talk on conservation and our efforts
Our conservation efforts include:

1.

Human-Predator conflict

The Livestock Guarding Dog Programme has placed 258 dogs on South African farms since 2005 to provide a non-lethal means of predator control resulting in about 375,000 hectares of cheetah/predator safe areas. We participate in Farmer and Wildlife forums in order to better understand conservation issues and provide assistance. 2. Cheetah Population Cheetah Outreach is an adviser to Range-wide Cheetah and Wild dog conservation group. It supports the effort to stop illegal trade in cheetah and breeding by managing the Regional Cheetah Studbook. 3. Education Cheetah Outreach hosts a curriculum-linked series of interactive presentations providing South African children from all backgrounds the opportunity to learn about and be inspired by their natural wildlife heritage.  We see up to 5 000 learners annually, providing sponsored transport to disadvantaged communites.   The school programme has evolved to develop curriculum- linked resources addressing literacy and Natural Science in four of our national languages 4. Research Our research projects have included cheetah health, human-wildlife conflict and conservation education.  We have produced publications and technical reports for the international audience.  We plan to do a first of its kind census in cheetah range, focused on areas outside of protected areas.
Promoting the survival of the free ranging, South African cheetah through environmental education and conservation initiatives.
Cheetah Outreach